Making and Modifying Graphs

LightGraphs.jl provides a number of methods for creating a graph object, including tools for building and modifying graph objects, a wide array of graph generator functions, and the ability to read and write graphs from files (using GraphIO.jl).

Modifying graphs

LightGraphs.jl offers a range of tools for modifying graphs, including:

LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleGraphFromIteratorFunction
SimpleGraphFromIterator(iter)

Create a SimpleGraph from an iterator iter. The elements in iter must be of type <: SimpleEdge.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph(3);

julia> add_edge!(g, 1, 2);

julia> add_edge!(g, 2, 3);

julia> h = SimpleGraphFromIterator(edges(g));

julia> collect(edges(h))
2-element Array{LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleEdge{Int64},1}:
 Edge 1 => 2
 Edge 2 => 3
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleDiGraphFromIteratorFunction
SimpleDiGraphFromIterator(iter)

Create a SimpleDiGraph from an iterator iter. The elements in iter must be of type <: SimpleEdge.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleDiGraph(2);

julia> add_edge!(g, 1, 2);

julia> add_edge!(g, 2, 1);

julia> h = SimpleDiGraphFromIterator(edges(g))
{2, 2} directed simple Int64 graph

julia> collect(edges(h))
2-element Array{LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleEdge{Int64},1}:
 Edge 1 => 2
 Edge 2 => 1
source
LightGraphs.EdgeType
Edge

A datastruture representing an edge between two vertices in a Graph or DiGraph.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.add_edge!Function
add_edge!(g, e)

Add an edge e to graph g. Return true if edge was added successfully, otherwise return false.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph(2);

julia> add_edge!(g, 1, 2)
true

julia> add_edge!(g, 2, 3)
false
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.rem_edge!Function
rem_edge!(g, e)

Remove an edge e from graph g. Return true if edge was removed successfully, otherwise return false.

Implementation Notes

If rem_edge! returns false, the graph may be in an indeterminate state, as there are multiple points where the function can exit with false.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph(2);

julia> add_edge!(g, 1, 2);

julia> rem_edge!(g, 1, 2)
true

julia> rem_edge!(g, 1, 2)
false
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.add_vertex!Function
add_vertex!(g)

Add a new vertex to the graph g. Return true if addition was successful.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph(Int8(typemax(Int8) - 1))
{126, 0} undirected simple Int8 graph

julia> add_vertex!(g)
true

julia> add_vertex!(g)
false
source
LightGraphs.add_vertices!Function
add_vertices!(g, n)

Add n new vertices to the graph g. Return the number of vertices that were added successfully.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph()
{0, 0} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> add_vertices!(g, 2)
2
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.rem_vertex!Function
rem_vertex!(g, v)

Remove the vertex v from graph g. Return false if removal fails (e.g., if vertex is not in the graph); true otherwise.

Performance

Time complexity is $\mathcal{O}(k^2)$, where $k$ is the max of the degrees of vertex $v$ and vertex $|V|$.

Implementation Notes

This operation has to be performed carefully if one keeps external data structures indexed by edges or vertices in the graph, since internally the removal is performed swapping the vertices v and $|V|$, and removing the last vertex $|V|$ from the graph. After removal the vertices in g will be indexed by $1:|V|-1$.

Examples

julia> using LightGraphs

julia> g = SimpleGraph(2);

julia> rem_vertex!(g, 2)
true

julia> rem_vertex!(g, 2)
false
source
Base.zeroFunction
zero(G)

Return a zero-vertex, zero-edge version of the graph type G. The fallback is defined for graph values zero(g::G) = zero(G).

Examples

julia> g = SimpleDiGraph([0 1 0 0 0; 0 0 1 0 0; 1 0 0 1 0; 0 0 0 0 1; 0 0 0 1 0]);

julia> zero(typeof(g))
{0, 0} directed simple Int64 graph

julia> zero(g)
{0, 0} directed simple Int64 graph
source

In addition to these core functions, more advanced operators can be found in Operators.

Graph Generators

LightGraphs.jl implements numerous graph generators, including random graph generators, constructors for classic graphs, numerous small graphs with familiar topologies, and random and static graphs embedded in Euclidean space.

Datasets

Other notorious graphs and integration with the MatrixDepot.jl package are available in the Datasets submodule of the companion package LightGraphsExtras.jl. Selected graphs from the Stanford Large Network Dataset Collection may be found in the SNAPDatasets.jl package.

All Generators

LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleDiGraphMethod
SimpleDiGraph{T}(nv, ne; seed=-1)

Construct a random SimpleDiGraph{T} with nv vertices and ne edges. The graph is sampled uniformly from all such graphs. If seed >= 0, a random generator is seeded with this value. If not specified, the element type T is the type of nv.

See also

erdos_renyi

Examples

julia> SimpleDiGraph(5, 7)
{5, 7} directed simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleGraphMethod
SimpleGraph{T}(nv, ne, edgestream::Channel)

Construct a SimpleGraph{T} with nv vertices and ne edges from edgestream. Can result in less than ne edges if the channel edgestream is closed prematurely. Duplicate edges are only counted once. The element type is the type of nv.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleGraphMethod
SimpleGraph{T}(nv, ne, smb::StochasticBlockModel)

Construct a random SimpleGraph{T} with nv vertices and ne edges. The graph is sampled according to the stochastic block model smb. The element type is the type of nv.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleGraphMethod
SimpleGraph{T}(nv, ne; seed=-1)

Construct a random SimpleGraph{T} with nv vertices and ne edges. The graph is sampled uniformly from all such graphs. If seed >= 0, a random generator is seeded with this value. If not specified, the element type T is the type of nv.

See also

erdos_renyi

Examples

julia> SimpleGraph(5, 7)
{5, 7} undirected simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.StochasticBlockModelType
StochasticBlockModel{T,P}

A type capturing the parameters of the SBM. Each vertex is assigned to a block and the probability of edge (i,j) depends only on the block labels of vertex i and vertex j.

The assignement is stored in nodemap and the block affinities a k by k matrix is stored in affinities.

affinities[k,l] is the probability of an edge between any vertex in block k and any vertex in block l.

Implementation Notes

Graphs are generated by taking random $i,j ∈ V$ and flipping a coin with probability affinities[nodemap[i],nodemap[j]].

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.barabasi_albert!Method
barabasi_albert!(g::AbstractGraph, n::Integer, k::Integer)

Create a Barabási–Albert model random graph with n vertices. It is grown by adding new vertices to an initial graph g. Each new vertex is attached with k edges to k different vertices already present in the system by preferential attachment.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> g = cycle_graph(4)
{4, 4} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> barabasi_albert!(g, 16, 3);

julia> g
{16, 40} undirected simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.barabasi_albertMethod
barabasi_albert(n::Integer, n0::Integer, k::Integer)

Create a Barabási–Albert model random graph with n vertices. It is grown by adding new vertices to an initial graph with n0 vertices. Each new vertex is attached with k edges to k different vertices already present in the system by preferential attachment. Initial graphs are undirected and consist of isolated vertices by default.

Optional Arguments

  • is_directed=false: if true, return a directed graph.
  • complete=false: if true, use a complete graph for the initial graph.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> barabasi_albert(10, 3, 2)
{10, 14} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> barabasi_albert(100, Int8(10), 3, is_directed=true, seed=123)
{100, 270} directed simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.barabasi_albertMethod
barabasi_albert(n, k)

Create a Barabási–Albert model random graph with n vertices. It is grown by adding new vertices to an initial graph with k vertices. Each new vertex is attached with k edges to k different vertices already present in the system by preferential attachment. Initial graphs are undirected and consist of isolated vertices by default.

Optional Arguments

  • is_directed=false: if true, return a directed graph.
  • complete=false: if true, use a complete graph for the initial graph.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> barabasi_albert(50, 3)
{50, 141} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> barabasi_albert(100, Int8(10), is_directed=true, complete=true, seed=123)
{100, 990} directed simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.dorogovtsev_mendesMethod
dorogovtsev_mendes(n)

Generate a random n vertex graph by the Dorogovtsev-Mendes method (with n \ge 3).

The Dorogovtsev-Mendes process begins with a triangle graph and inserts n-3 additional vertices. Each time a vertex is added, a random edge is selected and the new vertex is connected to the two endpoints of the chosen edge. This creates graphs with a many triangles and a high local clustering coefficient.

It is often useful to track the evolution of the graph as vertices are added, you can access the graph from the tth stage of this algorithm by accessing the first t vertices with g[1:t].

References

  • http://graphstream-project.org/doc/Generators/Dorogovtsev-Mendes-generator/
  • https://arxiv.org/pdf/cond-mat/0106144.pdf#page=24

Examples

julia> dorogovtsev_mendes(10)
{10, 17} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> dorogovtsev_mendes(11, seed=123)
{11, 19} undirected simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.erdos_renyiMethod
erdos_renyi(n, ne)

Create an Erdős–Rényi random graph with n vertices and ne edges.

Optional Arguments

  • is_directed=false: if true, return a directed graph.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> erdos_renyi(10, 30)
{10, 30} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> erdos_renyi(10, 30, is_directed=true, seed=123)
{10, 30} directed simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.erdos_renyiMethod
erdos_renyi(n, p)

Create an Erdős–Rényi random graph with n vertices. Edges are added between pairs of vertices with probability p.

Optional Arguments

  • is_directed=false: if true, return a directed graph.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> erdos_renyi(10, 0.5)
{10, 20} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> erdos_renyi(10, 0.5, is_directed=true, seed=123)
{10, 49} directed simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.expected_degree_graphMethod
expected_degree_graph(ω)

Given a vector of expected degrees ω indexed by vertex, create a random undirected graph in which vertices i and j are connected with probability ω[i]*ω[j]/sum(ω).

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Implementation Notes

The algorithm should work well for maximum(ω) << sum(ω). As maximum(ω) approaches sum(ω), some deviations from the expected values are likely.

References

Examples

# 1)
julia> g = expected_degree_graph([3, 1//2, 1//2, 1//2, 1//2])
{5, 3} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> print(degree(g))
[3, 0, 1, 1, 1]

# 2)
julia> g = expected_degree_graph([0.5, 0.5, 0.5], seed=123)
{3, 1} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> print(degree(g))
[1, 0, 1]
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.random_configuration_modelMethod
random_configuration_model(n, ks)

Create a random undirected graph according to the configuration model containing n vertices, with each node i having degree k[i].

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.
  • check_graphical=false: if true, ensure that k is a graphical sequence

(see isgraphical).

Performance

Time complexity is approximately $\mathcal{O}(n \bar{k}^2)$.

Implementation Notes

Allocates an array of $n \bar{k}$ Ints.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.random_orientation_dagMethod
random_orientation_dag(g)

Generate a random oriented acyclical digraph. The function takes in a simple graph and a random number generator as an argument. The probability of each directional acyclic graph randomly being generated depends on the architecture of the original directed graph.

DAG's have a finite topological order; this order is randomly generated via "order = randperm()".

Examples

julia> random_orientation_dag(complete_graph(10))
{10, 45} directed simple Int64 graph

julia> random_orientation_dag(star_graph(Int8(10)), 123)
{10, 9} directed simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.random_regular_digraphMethod
random_regular_digraph(n, k)

Create a random directed regular graph with n vertices, each with degree k.

Optional Arguments

  • dir=:out: the direction of the edges for degree parameter.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Implementation Notes

Allocates an $n × n$ sparse matrix of boolean as an adjacency matrix and uses that to generate the directed graph.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.random_regular_graphMethod
random_regular_graph(n, k)

Create a random undirected regular graph with n vertices, each with degree k.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Performance

Time complexity is approximately $\mathcal{O}(nk^2)$.

Implementation Notes

Allocates an array of nk Ints, and . For $k > \frac{n}{2}$, generates a graph of degree $n-k-1$ and returns its complement.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.random_tournament_digraphMethod
random_tournament_digraph(n)

Create a random directed tournament graph with n vertices.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> random_tournament_digraph(5)
{5, 10} directed simple Int64 graph

julia> random_tournament_digraph(Int8(10), seed=123)
{10, 45} directed simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.static_fitness_modelMethod
static_fitness_model(m, fitness)

Generate a random graph with $|fitness|$ vertices and m edges, in which the probability of the existence of $Edge_{ij}$ is proportional to $fitness_i × fitness_j$.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Performance

Time complexity is $\mathcal{O}(|V| + |E| log |E|)$.

References

  • Goh K-I, Kahng B, Kim D: Universal behaviour of load distribution in scale-free networks. Phys Rev Lett 87(27):278701, 2001.

Examples

julia> g = static_fitness_model(5, [1, 1, 0.5, 0.1])
{4, 5} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> edges(g) |> collect
5-element Array{LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleEdge{Int64},1}:
 Edge 1 => 2
 Edge 1 => 3
 Edge 1 => 4
 Edge 2 => 3
 Edge 2 => 4
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.static_fitness_modelMethod
static_fitness_model(m, fitness_out, fitness_in)

Generate a random directed graph with $|fitness\_out + fitness\_in|$ vertices and m edges, in which the probability of the existence of $Edge_{ij}$ is proportional with respect to $i ∝ fitness\_out$ and $j ∝ fitness\_in$.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Performance

Time complexity is $\mathcal{O}(|V| + |E| log |E|)$.

References

  • Goh K-I, Kahng B, Kim D: Universal behaviour of load distribution in scale-free networks. Phys Rev Lett 87(27):278701, 2001.

Examples

julia> g = static_fitness_model(6, [1, 0.2, 0.2, 0.2], [0.1, 0.1, 0.1, 0.9]; seed=123)
{4, 6} directed simple Int64 graph

julia> edges(g) |> collect
6-element Array{LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleEdge{Int64},1}:
 Edge 1 => 2
 Edge 1 => 3
 Edge 1 => 4
 Edge 2 => 3
 Edge 2 => 4
 Edge 3 => 4
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.static_scale_freeMethod
static_scale_free(n, m, α_out, α_in)

Generate a random graph with n vertices, m edges and expected power-law degree distribution with exponent α_out for outbound edges and α_in for inbound edges.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.
  • finite_size_correction=true: determines whether to use the finite size correction

proposed by Cho et al.

Performance

Time complexity is $\mathcal{O}(|V| + |E| log |E|)$.

References

  • Goh K-I, Kahng B, Kim D: Universal behaviour of load distribution in scale-free networks. Phys Rev Lett 87(27):278701, 2001.
  • Chung F and Lu L: Connected components in a random graph with given degree sequences. Annals of Combinatorics 6, 125-145, 2002.
  • Cho YS, Kim JS, Park J, Kahng B, Kim D: Percolation transitions in scale-free networks under the Achlioptas process. Phys Rev Lett 103:135702, 2009.
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.static_scale_freeMethod
static_scale_free(n, m, α)

Generate a random graph with n vertices, m edges and expected power-law degree distribution with exponent α.

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.
  • finite_size_correction=true: determines whether to use the finite size correction

proposed by Cho et al.

Performance

Time complexity is $\mathcal{O}(|V| + |E| log |E|)$.

References

  • Goh K-I, Kahng B, Kim D: Universal behaviour of load distribution in scale-free networks. Phys Rev Lett 87(27):278701, 2001.
  • Chung F and Lu L: Connected components in a random graph with given degree sequences. Annals of Combinatorics 6, 125-145, 2002.
  • Cho YS, Kim JS, Park J, Kahng B, Kim D: Percolation transitions in scale-free networks under the Achlioptas process. Phys Rev Lett 103:135702, 2009.
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.stochastic_block_modelMethod
stochastic_block_model(c, n)

Return a Graph generated according to the Stochastic Block Model (SBM).

c[a,b] : Mean number of neighbors of a vertex in block a belonging to block b. Only the upper triangular part is considered, since the lower traingular is determined by $c[b,a] = c[a,b] * \frac{n[a]}{n[b]}$. n[a] : Number of vertices in block a

Optional Arguments

  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

For a dynamic version of the SBM see the StochasticBlockModel type and related functions.

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.watts_strogatzMethod
watts_strogatz(n, k, β)

Return a Watts-Strogatz small world random graph with n vertices, each with expected degree k (or `k

  • 1ifkis odd). Edges are randomized per the model based on probabilityβ`.

The algorithm proceeds as follows. First, a perfect 1-lattice is constructed, where each vertex has exacly div(k, 2) neighbors on each side (i.e., k or k - 1 in total). Then the following steps are repeated for a hop length i of 1 through div(k, 2).

  1. Consider each vertex s in turn, along with the edge to its ith nearest neighbor t, in a clockwise sense.

  2. Generate a uniformly random number r. If r ≥ β, then the edge (s, t) is left unaltered. Otherwise, the edge is deleted and rewired so that s is connected to some vertex d, chosen uniformly at random from the entire graph, excluding s and its neighbors. (Note that t is a valid candidate.)

For β = 1, the graph will remain a 1-lattice, and for β = 0, all edges will be rewired randomly.

Optional Arguments

  • is_directed=false: if true, return a directed graph.
  • seed=-1: set the RNG seed.

Examples

julia> watts_strogatz(10, 4, 0.3)
{10, 20} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> watts_strogatz(Int8(10), 4, 0.8, is_directed=true, seed=123)
{10, 20} directed simple Int8 graph

References

source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.barbell_graphMethod
barbell_graph(n1, n2)

Create a barbell graph consisting of a clique of size n1 connected by an edge to a clique of size n2.

Implementation Notes

Preserves the eltype of n1 and n2. Will error if the required number of vertices exceeds the eltype. n1 and n2 must be at least 1 so that both cliques are non-empty. The cliques are organized with nodes 1:n1 being the left clique and n1+1:n1+n2 being the right clique. The cliques are connected by and edge (n1, n1+1).

Examples

julia> barbell_graph(3, 4)
{7, 10} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> barbell_graph(Int8(5), Int8(5))
{10, 21} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.circular_ladder_graphMethod
circular_ladder_graph(n)

Create a circular ladder graph consisting of 2n nodes and 3n edges. This is also known as the prism graph.

Implementation Notes

Preserves the eltype of the partitions vector. Will error if the required number of vertices exceeds the eltype. n must be at least 3 to avoid self-loops and multi-edges.

Examples

julia> circular_ladder_graph(3)
{6, 9} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> circular_ladder_graph(Int8(4))
{8, 12} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.clique_graphMethod
clique_graph(k, n)

Create a graph consisting of n connected k-cliques.

Examples

julia> clique_graph(4, 10)
{40, 70} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> clique_graph(Int8(10), Int8(4))
{40, 184} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.complete_multipartite_graphMethod
complete_multipartite_graph(partitions)

Create an undirected complete bipartite graph with sum(partitions) vertices. A partition with 0 vertices is skipped.

Implementation Notes

Preserves the eltype of the partitions vector. Will error if the required number of vertices exceeds the eltype.

Examples

julia> complete_multipartite_graph([1,2,3])
{6, 11} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> complete_multipartite_graph(Int8[5,5,5])
{15, 75} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.double_binary_treeMethod
double_binary_tree(k::Integer)

Create a double complete binary tree with k levels.

References

  • Used as an example for spectral clustering by Guattery and Miller 1998.

Examples

julia> double_binary_tree(4)
{30, 29} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> double_binary_tree(Int8(5))
{62, 61} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.gridMethod
grid(dims; periodic=false)

Create a $|dims|$-dimensional cubic lattice, with length dims[i] in dimension i.

Optional Arguments

  • periodic=false: If true, the resulting lattice will have periodic boundary

condition in each dimension.

Examples

julia> grid([2,3])
{6, 7} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> grid(Int8[2, 2, 2], periodic=true)
{8, 12} undirected simple Int8 graph

julia> grid((2,3))
{6, 7} undirected simple Int64 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.ladder_graphMethod
ladder_graph(n)

Create a ladder graph consisting of 2n nodes and 3n-2 edges.

Implementation Notes

Preserves the eltype of n. Will error if the required number of vertices exceeds the eltype.

Examples

julia> ladder_graph(3)
{6, 7} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> ladder_graph(Int8(4))
{8, 10} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.lollipop_graphMethod
lollipop_graph(n1, n2)

Create a lollipop graph consisting of a clique of size n1 connected by an edge to a path of size n2.

Implementation Notes

Preserves the eltype of n1 and n2. Will error if the required number of vertices exceeds the eltype. n1 and n2 must be at least 1 so that both the clique and the path have at least one vertex. The graph is organized with nodes 1:n1 being the clique and n1+1:n1+n2 being the path. The clique is connected to the path by an edge (n1, n1+1).

Examples

julia> lollipop_graph(2, 5)
{7, 6} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> lollipop_graph(Int8(3), Int8(4))
{7, 7} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.turan_graphMethod
turan_graph(n, r)

Creates a Turán Graph, a complete multipartite graph with n vertices and r partitions.

Examples

julia> turan_graph(6, 2)
{6, 9} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> turan_graph(Int8(7), 2)
{7, 12} undirected simple Int8 graph
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.smallgraphMethod
smallgraph(s)
smallgraph(s)

Create a small graph of type s. Admissible values for s are:

sgraph type
:bullA bull graph.
:chvatalA Chvátal graph.
:cubicalA Platonic cubical graph.
:desarguesA Desarguesgraph.
:diamondA diamond graph.
:dodecahedralA Platonic dodecahedral graph.
:fruchtA Frucht graph.
:heawoodA Heawood graph.
:houseA graph mimicing the classic outline of a house.
:housexA house graph, with two edges crossing the bottom square.
:icosahedralA Platonic icosahedral graph.
:karateA social network graph called Zachary's karate club.
:krackhardtkiteA Krackhardt-Kite social network graph.
:moebiuskantorA Möbius-Kantor graph.
:octahedralA Platonic octahedral graph.
:pappusA Pappus graph.
:petersenA Petersen graph.
:sedgewickmazeA simple maze graph used in Sedgewick's Algorithms in C++: Graph Algorithms (3rd ed.)
:tetrahedralA Platonic tetrahedral graph.
:truncatedcubeA skeleton of the truncated cube graph.
:truncatedtetrahedronA skeleton of the truncated tetrahedron graph.
:truncatedtetrahedron_dirA skeleton of the truncated tetrahedron digraph.
:tutteA Tutte graph.
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.euclidean_graphMethod
euclidean_graph(N, d; seed=-1, L=1., p=2., cutoff=-1., bc=:open)

Generate N uniformly distributed points in the box $[0,L]^{d}$ and return a Euclidean graph, a map containing the distance on each edge and a matrix with the points' positions.

Examples

julia> g, dists = euclidean_graph(5, 2, cutoff=0.3);

julia> g
{5, 4} undirected simple Int64 graph

julia> dists
Dict{LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.SimpleEdge{Int64},Float64} with 4 entries:
  Edge 1 => 5 => 0.205756
  Edge 2 => 5 => 0.271359
  Edge 2 => 4 => 0.247703
  Edge 4 => 5 => 0.168372
source
LightGraphs.SimpleGraphs.euclidean_graphMethod
euclidean_graph(points)

Given the d×N matrix points build an Euclidean graph of N vertices and return a graph and Dict containing the distance on each edge.

Optional Arguments

  • L=1: used to bound the d dimensional box from which points are selected.
  • p=2
  • bc=:open

Implementation Notes

Defining the d-dimensional vectors x[i] = points[:,i], an edge between vertices i and j is inserted if norm(x[i]-x[j], p) < cutoff. In case of negative cutoff instead every edge is inserted. For p=2 we have the standard Euclidean distance. Set bc=:periodic to impose periodic boundary conditions in the box $[0,L]^d$.

Examples

julia> pts = rand(3, 10); # 10 vertices in R^3

julia> g, dists = euclidean_graph(pts, p=1, bc=:periodic) # Taxicab-distance (L^1);

julia> g
{10, 45} undirected simple Int64 graph
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